Drug Treatment

Addictions Effects on the Brain

Addicted people often are nervous or afraid to go into rehab. Most people don’t really know what goes on in a rehabilitation facility, and others believe they are impersonal, hospital-like places that are actively unpleasant to be in. With so much uncertainty about what rehab centers are like or what exactly their treatment programs entail, it’s completely natural for people to be a bit wary before they commit to a stay at one. Fortunately, rehab is much more accepting than its public image would have you believe.

The staff of physicians, nurses, and licensed counselors at facilities like The Ridge have made each patient’s recovery their top priority. It’s their job and their passion to get their patients healthy and sober, and as a result will give them all the support and help they need to get there. They understand how difficult it is for an addicted person to fight their disease and gain the strength to overcome it. They’ve seen it over and over, and some have even experienced it themselves. Because of this, they’re sympathetic to patients’ struggles and insecurities, and will share their experience, expertise, and empathy with them.

The Ridge uses a modified twelve-step program as part of its treatment. This famous method involves admitting that a patient is powerless in the face of addiction and they have to turn to others and a higher power for support in order to achieve recovery. We believe this method is a great way to help addicted people to get to recovery, but we acknowledge that some may be wary of it. Religiously skeptic patients may not appreciate being made to submit to a higher power. However, the higher power referenced in the twelve steps does not necessarily need to be a deity. While religious patients may choose to define the higher power as God, non-religious patients can define it as whatever they choose.

We also employ cognitive-behavioral therapy at The Ridge. This type of therapy says that an addicted person’s way of thinking and behaving are shaped by their addiction, and that even if they get sober, if their thinking and behavior remain the same, they will soon backslide into their old drug or alcohol habits. During cognitive-behavioral therapy, patients will talk to a counselor to identify the mental triggers for cravings, and work to find ways to live comfortably without encountering those triggers. This kind of therapy emphasizes the strength and power of one’s own mind in the fight against addiction.

With a compassionate staff and clear, understandable treatment methods and goals, drug treatment is nothing to be afraid of, but instead an invaluable asset for an addicted person to get healthy again.

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