Major League Baseball Adds Opioids & Other Drugs To Screening Process

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Major League Baseball announced on Thursday, December 12, 2019, that it will begin screening for Opioids, Fentanyl, Cocaine and Synthetic THC, and other common drugs of abuse. While the MLB has for years tested for performance-enhancing substances, surprisingly it has not tested for illegal drugs of abuse unless a specific circumstance warranted it. The league will also enact educational programs on the dangers of opioid pain medications and practical approaches to marijuana. Additionally, the MLB has removed natural cannabis from its list of drugs of abuse and intends to treat marijuana under its existing alcohol-related policies.

The additional screening is in response to the tragic July 1 death of Los Angeles Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs. The screenings are intended to facilitate treatment not be punitive to players. The Ridge applauds this decision as it is well known that treatment works to combat addiction and save lives.


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Major League Baseball announced on Thursday, December 12, 2019, that it will begin screening for Opioids, Fentanyl, Cocaine and Synthetic THC, and other common drugs of abuse. While the MLB has for years tested for performance-enhancing substances, surprisingly it has not tested for illegal drugs of abuse unless a specific circumstance warranted it. The league will also enact educational programs on the dangers of opioid pain medications and practical approaches to marijuana. Additionally, the MLB has removed natural cannabis from its list of drugs of abuse and intends to treat marijuana under its existing alcohol-related policies.

The additional screening is in response to the tragic July 1 death of Los Angeles Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs. The screenings are intended to facilitate treatment not be punitive to players. The Ridge applauds this decision as it is well known that treatment works to combat addiction and save lives.


Image
Major League Baseball announced on Thursday, December 12, 2019, that it will begin screening for Opioids, Fentanyl, Cocaine and Synthetic THC, and other common drugs of abuse. While the MLB has for years tested for performance-enhancing substances, surprisingly it has not tested for illegal drugs of abuse unless a specific circumstance warranted it. The league will also enact educational programs on the dangers of opioid pain medications and practical approaches to marijuana. Additionally, the MLB has removed natural cannabis from its list of drugs of abuse and intends to treat marijuana under its existing alcohol-related policies.

The additional screening is in response to the tragic July 1 death of Los Angeles Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs. The screenings are intended to facilitate treatment not be punitive to players. The Ridge applauds this decision as it is well known that treatment works to combat addiction and save lives.